Would you like to feel contentment, functioning at your highest level?


Looking for help to reduce unpleasant states such as ruminating, fears, obsessive thoughts, persistent  negative feelings or judgments?


Often these are indicators of anxiety or depression. Both states respond exceptionally well to Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy. Developing awareness of your thoughts and emotions through paying attention helps free you from those states. More here about how to apply mindfulness to life situations.

I truly believe Mindfulness-based psychotherapy brings out the best of human possibilities. However, negative emotional states, distorted perceptions, or old attitudes and patterns of behavior can get in the way. But they don’t necessarily condemn you to an unsatisfactory life.

Are you stuck, hurting, frustrated…again?

I believe you’re not locked in to how things are now, but with skillful guidance can shift things more to your liking.

From a cognitive mindfulness perspective, we’ll focus a little less on your childhood or history looking for what’s “wrong” about you, more on what’s going on in your life right now, how you’d like it to be different. Along the way you’ll be reminded about positive aspects of yourself. This approach leads to increased clarity and an untangled mind. In other words, you aren’t the problem, you’re great the way you are…but maybe your attitude, perspective or behavior could be improved upon!

Being reflective helps the mind become quiet, focused, spacious and stable, reducing distracting mind-chatter. Consequently, this allows insight and clarity to arise, which leads to increased self-awareness, resulting in being less emotionally reactive or scattered both of which lead to indecisiveness. Ultimately, more accurate perception, judgment and decision-making emerge.


Does this sound good to you?


Cutting edge research with brain imaging indicates, among other findings, that areas of the brain associated with intense or reactive emotions like fear or anxiety become inactive, or calm, during meditation, whereas centers responsible for compassionate and loving feelings become more active!


Anyone can benefit from mindfulness based therapy, a meditation practice isn’t essential though helpful.



” My daughter was diagnosed with anxiety when she was six. Having learned from you I was able to recognize the anxiety and to talk about it with her. I was able to explain using your example of a runaway train, how anxiety can hijack your thoughts. I feel lucky to be able to help her which I would never have been able to do had it not been for you. Thank you for all that you did for me and all that you do for others.”

D.M., 41 year female